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Criminal Justice

The Bill of Rights protects us against suspicionless searches and seizures. It guarantees due process to individuals who are accused of crimes and humane treatment to those who are incarcerated. The ACLU works to ensure that our criminal justice system indeed is just.
Stop the school to prison pipeline
Washington Needs Bail Reform:  Download No Money, No Freedom
Driven to Fail: Exposing the costs & ineffectiveness of Washington's most commonly charged crime
The death penalty is arbitrary, unfair, and racially biased.  The ACLU of Washington argued before the Washington Supreme Court to end it.


Monday, March 12, 2018
America’s juvenile justice system was established more than 100 years ago with the goal of rehabilitating youth who break the law. It reflects the belief that children who commit offenses should have an opportunity to account for their wrongdoing, change their behavior, and become productive members of society. But since 1997 Washington courts have treated some youth differently under a law called "automatic decline."
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, March 6, 2018
The Washington Legislature has passed a bill (E2SHB 1783) which will ensure that poor people are not unfairly jailed or tied for years to the criminal justice system because they are unable to pay court-imposed debts known as Legal Financial Obligations (LFOs).
Monday, February 12, 2018
What if there was a criminal charge that was ineffective and unfair? And what if taxpayers were spending billions to enforce it?
Thursday, October 12, 2017
Every person in America has a right to be free from invasive searches by the government, and that right does not disappear simply because one is accused of a crime.

Voting Rights Restoration in Washington State

Document, Published: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Under Washington law, individuals convicted of felonies that have their right to vote automatically restored as soon as they have completed incarceration and any community custody required by the Department of Corrections. This brochure briefly explains the law and answers frequently asked questions.  

Frequently Asked Questions About Voting Restoration in Washington

Document, Published: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017
The 2009 Washington Legislature passed a new law that restores the right to vote automatically to people with felony convictions when they have completed their time in prison and have served any required community custody supervised by the State Department of Corrections (DOC).