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Youth

All young people must have the opportunity to meaningfully participate in our society.  The ACLU Youth Policy project seeks to ensure that young people – particularly those who have been historically excluded or underserved – receive meaningful education and services in communities, instead of being pushed to a juvenile justice system that will undermine their ability to be successful as adults.  Our current focus is on reforming school discipline policies and practices, working to limit school-based referrals to the juvenile justice system, and decreasing the over-reliance on jails and prisons for young people in the juvenile and adult criminal law systems.
Stop pushing special education students out of school:  ACLU of Washington lawsuit seeks to stop students who require special education from being pushed out of Washington's public schools
PSA to student protesters: You have rights!
Taking a knee: A guide for administrators, teachers, parents, and students
Prosecutors should think twice before charging teens who sext

Resources

Published: 
Tuesday, September 27, 2016
The ACLU of Washington recently filed friend of the court briefs in three cases urging the Washington Supreme Court to align the law with developments in brain science.
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, June 28, 2016
Federal Court Grants Class-Action Status in Challenge to Obama Administration

The Rights of Transgender People in Washington State

Document, Published: 
Friday, May 27, 2016
This brochure is designed to help transgender persons understand their legal rights in Washington State. It answers many common questions about practical legal issues encountered by transgender individuals.
Published: 
Friday, April 29, 2016
This month, two high school students in Clarkston School District in Asotin County were charged originally with felony assault.  Their crime?  Discharging fart spray in the library.   
Published: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
Youth are categorically different from adults. They are more impulsive, less able to fully comprehend the consequences of their actions, and hold greater promise for rehabilitation.
Published: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015
When a juvenile is caught using or sharing an illegal drug, what is the appropriate community response? Should he or she be arrested and charged with a crime, or should he or she receive public health services?
Published: 
Monday, August 17, 2015
The WA Supreme Court has ruled that a judge can consider a defendant’s young age in imposing a sentence for a crime committed after his 18th birthday. The ruling affirmed what parents have known and scientists have confirmed: that the brain does not achieve full maturity until well past the age of 18.
Published: 
Monday, June 29, 2015
More than 100 years ago, Washington lawmakers created a separate juvenile justice system because they recognized that society benefits when juvenile courts focus on both accountability and rehabilitation.
Published: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
We are proud to announce the latest version of our transgender “Know Your Rights” guide, The Rights of Transgender People in Washington State.

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